Google AdWords Terms You Should Know Before Creating a Google Ads

1. Campaign: A campaign is a set of related ad groups that is often used to organize categories of products or services that you offer. Each campaign is centered on a goal that aligns with the main thing you want to get from your campaign, such as sales or website traffic. You'll need to make at least one campaign before you can create ads in your account.

2. Ad groups: An ad group contains one or more ads which target a shared set of keywords. Each of your campaigns is made up of one or more ad groups.

Use ad groups to organize your ads by a common theme. For example, try separating ad groups into the different product or service types you offer.

3. Campaign Type: The campaign type determines where customers will be able to see your ads, but you make this more specific by targeting your ads. Campaign types include: Search Network with Display Select, Search Network only, Display Network only, Shopping, Video, Universal app

The campaign subtype determines which settings and options are available, such as the types of ads you can design. These options let you tailor your campaign to match your business goals and focus on the features most relevant to you. Campaign subtypes include: Standard, All features, Marketing objectives

Campaign types are centered around Google's advertising networks: the Google Search Network, the Google Display Network, and the YouTube Network. These networks make up all of the places where your ads can appear, including Google sites, websites that show relevant Google ads, and other placements—like mobile apps. Choose a network setting by selecting a campaign type for your campaign.

4. Keywords: Words or phrases describing your product or service that you choose to help determine when and where your ad can appear. The keywords you choose are used to show your ads to people. Select high-quality, relevant keywords for your ad campaign to help you reach only the most interested people, who are more likely to become your customers.

When someone searches on Google, your ad could be eligible to appear based on the similarity of your keywords to the person's search terms, as well as your keyword match types. Keywords are also used to match your ad to sites in the Google Network that are related to your keywords and ads.

A great keyword list can help improve the performance of your ads and help you to avoid higher prices. Poor keywords can ultimately cause you to have higher prices and lower ad position. You can add match types to your keywords to help control which searches your ad can be matched with.

5. Quality Score: Quality Score is an estimate of the quality of your ads, keywords, and landing pages. Higher quality ads can lead to lower prices and better ad positions.

You can see your Quality Score (Quality Score is reported on a 1-10 scale and its components (expected clickthrough rate, ad relevance, and landing page experience) in your keywords’ “Status” column.

The more relevant your ads and landing pages are to the user, the more likely it is that you'll see higher Quality Scores. Quality Score is an aggregated estimate of your overall performance in ad auctions, and is not used at auction time to determine Ad Rank.

6. Impressions: How often your ad is shown. An impression is counted each time your ad is shown on a search result page or other site on the Google Network. Each time your ad appears on Google or the Google Network, it's counted as one impression.

In some cases, only a section of your ad may be shown. For example, in Google Maps, we may show only your business name and location or only your business name and the first line of your ad text.  However, when someone searches using Google Instant, an impression can be counted when one of these occur:

o Person begins to type and then clicks anywhere on the page like a search result, ad, or related search

o Person types a search and then clicks the "Search" button, presses Enter, or selects a predicted query from the drop-down menu

o Person stops typing, and the results are displayed for a minimum of three seconds

- You'll sometimes see the abbreviation "Impr" in your account showing the number of impressions for your ad.

7. Ad Rank: A value that's used to determine your ad position (where ads are shown on a page relative to other ads) and whether your ads will show at all.

Ad Rank is calculated using your bid amount, your auction-time ad quality (including expected clickthrough rate, ad relevance, and landing page experience), the Ad Rank thresholds, the context of the person’s search (for example, the person’s location, device, time of search, the nature of the search terms, the other ads and search results that show on the page, and other user signals and attributes), and the expected impact of extensions and other ad formats.

When estimating the expected impact of extensions and ad formats, we consider such factors as the relevance, clickthrough rates, and the prominence of the extensions or formats on the search results page. So even if your competition has higher bids than yours, you can still win a higher position at a lower price by using highly relevant keywords and ads.

Your Ad Rank is recalculated each time your ad is eligible to appear and competes in an auction, so your ad position can fluctuate each time depending on your competition, the context of the person's search, and your quality at that moment.

8. Ad extensions: A feature that shows extra business information with your ad, like an address, phone number, store rating, or more webpage links.

9. Click: When someone clicks your ad, like on the blue headline of a text ad, Google Ads counts that as a click. A click is counted even if the person doesn't reach your website, maybe because it's temporarily unavailable. As a result, you might see a difference between the number of clicks on your ad and the number of visits to your website.

Clicks can help you understand how well your ad is appealing to people who see it. Relevant, highly-targeted ads are more likely to receive clicks.

10. Click Through Rate (CTR): Clickthrough rate (CTR), which tells you how many people who’ve seen your ad end up clicking on it. This metric can help you gauge how enticing your ad is and how closely it matches your keywords and other targeting settings.

Note that a good CTR is relative to what you're advertising and on which networks. To help increase your clicks and CTR, start by creating great ad text and strong keywords to make ads that are highly relevant and very compelling to your customers.

11. Landing Page: The webpage where people end up after they click your ad. The URL of this page is usually the same as your ad's final URL. For each ad, you specify a final URL to determine the landing page where people are taken when they click your ad.

Google's policy is that your landing page and display URL (the webpage shown in your ad) must share the same domain. Your landing page experience is one of several factors that helps determine a keyword's Quality Score. The experience of a landing page is represented by such things as the usefulness and relevance of information provided on the page, ease of navigation for the user, and how many links are on the page.

12. Keyword Planner: Keyword Planner is a tool that provides keyword ideas and traffic estimates to help you build a Search Network campaign.

Search for keyword and ad groups ideas based on terms that describe your product or service, your website, or a product category related to what you're advertising. You can also enter or upload a list of keywords. And you can multiply two or more lists of keywords to create a new list that combines your keywords.

Get historical statistics, like the number of times people have searched for a keyword or how competitive that keyword is. You can also get traffic estimates, like how many clicks and impressions your keywords might get for given bid and budget amounts.

13. Daily budget: An amount that you set for each ad campaign to specify how much, on average, you'd like to spend each day. You set an average daily budget for each Google Ads campaign, and then the system will aim to show your ads as much as possible until your budget is met.

When your budget is reached, your ads will typically stop showing for that day. How quickly your ads are shown during a given day is determined by your ad delivery option.

It's possible that you'll be charged less or sometimes slightly more than your average daily budget amount on a given day. To help make sure that your ad can run a little more on days when it's very popular, your daily budget is used like an average: on any single day, you can spend up to 2 times your daily budget, but on other days your spend will be capped at a lower amount to make up for it. This is called over-delivery. For campaigns where you pay for conversions, your daily spend may exceed your average daily budget by more than 2 times.

However, in a given billing period, you're never charged more than the average number of days in a month (roughly 30.4) times your daily budget. For campaigns that are paused in the middle of the month or that otherwise don't run for the full month, you may see discrepancies between your average daily budgets and your total charges.

14. CPC: Cost-per-click (CPC) bidding means that you pay for each click on your ads. For CPC bidding campaigns, you set a maximum cost-per-click bid - or simply "max. CPC" - that's the highest amount that you're willing to pay for a click on your ad (unless you're setting bid adjustments, or using Enhanced CPC).

Your max. CPC is the most you'll typically be charged for a click, but you'll often be charged less -- sometimes much less. That final amount you're charged for a click is called your actual CPC. If you enter a max. CPC bid and someone clicks your ad, that click won't cost you more than the maximum CPC bid amount that you set.

You'll choose between manual bidding (you choose your bid amounts) and automatic bidding (let Google set bids to try to get the most clicks within your budget). CPC pricing is sometimes known as pay-per-click (PPC).

15. CPM: A way to bid where you pay per one thousand views (impressions) on the Google Display Network.

Viewable CPM bidding ensures that you only pay when your ads can be seen. Existing CPM bids will be converted to vCPM automatically, but it's best to update your bids since viewable impressions are potentially more valuable. 

16. Relevance: How closely the elements of your ad campaign match what a person seems to be looking for. Your ads and keywords should directly relate to the content on your website, especially the ad's landing page. When people see your ad, they should be able to understand what kind of product, service, or other content they'll find on your site.

To encourage you to create relevant ad campaigns that accurately represent your products or services, the Google Ads pricing system is partly based on relevance. A highly relevant ad, keyword list, and landing page is generally rewarded with a higher position on the page for potentially less money. Relevance is part of your Quality Score, a formula that Google uses to measure how useful your ad, keyword, and website are to a customer. Relevant ads tend to get higher Quality Scores.

17. Destination URL: The URL address of the page in your website that people reach when they click your ad. The domain of the destination URL needs to match the domain of your display URL. The destination URL isn’t displayed on your ads (the URL shown is your display URL).

18. Display URL: The webpage address that appears with your ad, typically shown in green text. Display URLs give people an idea of where they'll arrive after they click an ad. The landing page that you define with a final URL tends to be more specific. For example, if your display URL is www.example.com, your final URL might be example.com/sweaters.

For expanded text ads, your display URL consists of the domain of your final URL (and the subdomain, if you have one) and your two optional “Path” fields of up to 15 characters each.

o In rare scenarios, your subdomain may not be added to your display URL. For example, if your subdomain uses a trademarked term, your display URL may not include your subdomain. Learn more about Google Ads trademark policy

o Google constantly makes changes to Google Ads. As a result, Google may update the domain component of your display URL.

Your display URL may appear in your ad with a "www." prefix in lowercase letters (even if you enter it with capitalized letters). If your URL begins with a subdomain, your display URL may include it (for example, the support in support.google.com).

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