THE 25+ BEST SITES FOR FINDING REMOTE WORK ONLINE IN 2024

THE 25+ BEST SITES FOR FINDING REMOTE WORK ONLINE IN 2024

There are a ton of reasons to look for remote work online, now more than ever.

Maybe you’re a busy stay-at-home mom who wants to re-enter the workforce…but you need flexibility to pick up your kids from school and run errands. Or you have a mental health issue or disability that would be so much easier to manage at a work from home job. Maybe you’re a digital nomad who wants to travel the world while being able to telecommute from anywhere with an internet connection.

Even if one of those described you a few months ago, in 2020, this scenario is a lot more likely: Maybe, like billions across the world, you’re being forced to work from home due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

If you’ve been furloughed or laid off and stuck at home for the foreseeable future, you could be looking for remote work online out of necessity.

If that’s the case, know that you’re not alone, and that there are remote jobs available to you.

For many, working remotely has always meant living the dream of work-life balance. During a pandemic, it’s more complicated. Working from home with your kids in the house can be hard, and you may be dealing with isolation while working from home, or anxiety related to the frightening pandemic that is sweeping the globe in 2020.

If you are generally drawn to the wide range of jobs allowing you to commute from your living room while wearing your pajamas—maybe you already believed remote work is the answer. But, even if clocking in from home isn’t your ideal work situation, there are options for you. Either way, remote work doesn’t have to be a dream—the jobs are totally real! (Yes, even during the sobering economic crisis we are facing.)

In this post, you’ll find our curated list of the BEST sites for finding remote work, with new resources specifically related to searching for remote jobs during the unprecedented pandemic we find ourselves in.

Searching for (Remote) Work Online During the Pandemic

No advice on searching for a remote job would make sense without addressing the global pandemic that is changing the job market in ways we don’t yet fully understand. For many people who have lost their jobs or their businesses due to COVID-19 lockdowns, finding remote work isn’t a long-term dream anymore—it’s a short-term necessity.

When it comes to the job search, a lot has changed so far in 2020. Industries such as hospitality and travel have massively slowed hiring (for obvious reasons), but, according to a Fast Company article, others are booming: such as edtech, shipping and delivery, and online communication tools.

There is still real opportunity out there, especially if you have in-demand technical skills. And, what’s more exciting—there is a huge opportunity for you to use your tech skills to help during the crisis, even while working from home.

To help you navigate the job search in such a quickly evolving environment, we put together a webinar that you can rewatch at any time. We go in depth on everything from maintaining your mental health while searching for a job during this time, to positioning yourself in the new job market, to interviewing via video call.

How to Find (Remote) Work in Tech – Even During the Crisis (watch the replay below)

Resources for Finding Remote Tech Jobs Online, Even During the Crisis

It’s true, many companies and entire industries have stopped hiring for the present time. But many others are still taking on new employees, and even turning up the volume on hiring. It is still 100% possible to find work during this crisis!

Here are some sites that we have already found incredibly helpful for navigating the job market right now.

Still Hiring (by Hamza Khchichine)

Still Hiring is a searchable database of companies that are (you guessed it) still hiring during the COVID-19 pandemic. You can sign up for a weekly newsletter to get updates on available roles.

Hiring Freezes (by Candor)

Hiring Freezes is a user-generated list of companies with and without hiring freezes, set up by salary negotiation company Candor. It’s being updated in real-time, and, at the time of writing, it had entries for over 4,000 companies.

WFH But Hiring (by Free Agency)

WFH But Hiring is a resource for hiring in tech during COVID-19. If you recently lost your job, you can list yourself as looking for work. You can also browse available jobs in engineering, product, marketing, and more.

Remote Work Jobs Portal (by Remote Work Summit)

Remote Work Summit put together this resource hub for information on companies currently offering remote work, sites for finding remote work, and freelance gigs available.

Creative Community x Covid (by Becky Simpson of Chipper Things)

Designer Becky Simpson (creator of Chipper Things) set up this resource for designers, illustrators, and others in the creative community. It includes links to job boards, hiring resources, and useful Twitter threads, plus a creatives for hire page where you can add yourself to the list.

The Corona Hiring Sheet (by Florian Feichtinger & Paula Monteiro)

This is a job listing resource (focusing mostly on jobs in Western Europe) set up in a Google Sheet. You can list yourself if you’re looking for work, peruse jobs and freelance gig listings, and check out related resources.

Have another resource for finding work during the pandemic? Let us know at hello (at) skillcrush (dot) com, and we’ll add it to the list.

A Note on “Work From Home” Jobs, Telecommuting, and Remote Work

Our “What is Remote Work?” article provides a deeper breakdown on remote work terms and definitions, but let’s take a moment to clear up the difference between work from home jobs, telecommuting jobs, and remote work.Work from home jobs are exactly how they sound—jobs you can do from your home. This term speaks to the assumption that jobs are either done in a traditional office or from your living room (and you’ll see that there are plenty of other options in between), but—for many people—working out of their house is a perfect remote solution.

Telecommuting jobs typically allow people to work from their home (or elsewhere) for companies or organizations that are still in their immediate area. A job where someone works in an office three days a week, but spends two days working from home is a classic example of telecommuting.

Remote work is a catch-all term that applies to work that can be done from anywhere in the world (assuming the location has access to electricity, internet access, etc). Since work from home jobs and telecommuting jobs are subsets of remote work, we prefer to use remote work to describe any job that doesn’t involve being tied to a specific office or workplace. If you’re working from home, that’s remote work, but if you’re working from a coworking space, a coffee shop, or the beach, that’s remote work, too.

Keep in mind that, after the pandemic sent us all home in 2020, these distinctions have become less relevant! That said, it’s important to understand the lingo when diving into the job search.

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the number of people doing some or all of their work remotely was on the rise even before 2020, so there’s no time like the present to get in on the unique benefits and advantages a remote position has to offer. But where exactly can you find these remote opportunities, particularly if you’re in a time crunch and you’re ready to start leveraging a career or job change ASAP?

In order to help job seekers looking to escape the confines of a cubicle, we’ve compiled over 25 of the best sites for finding remote work. Whether you’re looking for full-time jobs, part-time jobs, jobs in tech, or jobs in other industries, each virtual job board listed is a go-to resource you need to start consulting, stat.

And—when you’re ready for a roadmap to prepare yourself for everything else involved in the remote job application process—check out our guide on Finding a Remote Job here.

These are the Best Sites for Finding Remote Work Online: Remote-Only Job Boards

1. FLEXJOBS

FlexJobs has over 50 remote jobs categories, with positions ranging from freelance gigs, to part-time work, to full-time jobs, with remote careers varying from entry-level to executive. The best part? FlexJobs screens their jobs before posting, so you don’t have to dig through any less than reputable opportunities. The virtual job board currently hosts more than 20,000 work-at-home and digital nomad job postings.

2. REMOTE.CO

Remote.co hand-curates their list of remote jobs. These listings include customer service positions, design opportunities, developer jobs, recruiter and HR roles, sales jobs, and other remote work (including writers, managers, and marketers). Remote.co’s virtual job board also has the handy feature of allowing you to search or browse by job type.
3. JUSTREMOTE

JustRemote is dedicated to building a better remote job platform, allowing job seekers to find their perfect role quickly and easily. JustRemote covers many job verticals including Development, Marketing and Design, HR, and Customer Success positions. You can filter roles by location, and their virtual job board clearly highlights whether positions have specific country or time overlap requirements.

4. VIRTUAL VOCATIONS

Virtual Vocations’ jobs board features telecommuting positions in job fields like technical writing and paralegal. The site was started by a stay-at-home mom who was frustrated with a lack of legitimate remote job listings online, and today the company is run by an entirely remote team. In addition to their jobs board, the site’s blog has great tips, including this article on how to pick up a seasonal remote gig during the holidays.

5. PANGIAN

Pangian is on a mission to unite all five continents by connecting remote-minded companies with remote employees. Their virtual job board provides a robust list of open, remote positions including web development, UX design, content creation, and digital marketing. Pangian also gives users the option to start an account and participate in their online community, where employers have a chance to learn more about potential employees’ specific skills, interests, and backgrounds.

6. WE WORK REMOTELY

With a simple, straightforward layout, this virtual job board is a catch-all of remote, work from home jobs from customer service, to web design, to programming. Living up to their stated goal of ”finding the most qualified people in the most unexpected place,” the We Work Remotely site connects over 130,000 monthly users with telecommuting opportunities. It’s your ticket to remote employment in no time.

7. REMOTIVE

Remotive is a bi-monthly newsletter for job seekers interested in working remotely. In addition to news about how to get hired at remote jobs and tips on life as a digital nomad, the newsletter also has a robust listing of remote positions. Remotive’s job listings are broken down by job type—sales, support, product engineering, marketing, etc.—making it easy to find the specific kind of job you’re looking for.

8. SKIP THE DRIVE

With a catchy (and appropriate) name, a handy resources tab that lists authors to follow and sites to check for advice in the world of working remotely, and a reliable list of remote jobs, this virtual job board is true to its eponymous mission. If you use the resources Skip the Drive provides, you can truly swap your ugly morning gridlock for a leisurely telecommute.
9. REMOTE OK

Remote OK is a remote job site that tags all of their job listings, making it simple and easy to set filters for the specific listings you want. You can choose to filter jobs posted by recruiters, by experience level (junior, senior, etc.), by job type (sales, marketing, design, dev, and more), and even whether they’re tech or non-tech related jobs (of course even the “non-tech” jobs—things like analysts and marketers—will benefit from some basic tech skills).

10. WORKING NOMADS

Working Nomads is a newsletter serviced dedicated to busy digital nomads. When you sign up for the service, Working Nomads will then deliver a curated list of remote jobs directly to your inbox. You can choose daily or weekly emails, then keep moving to the next city while the telecommuting job search comes to you.

11. JOBSPRESSO

Jobspresso features a wide range of curated jobs in tech, marketing, customer support, and more. You can search their virtual job board for openings and post your resume to be searched and seen by potential employers.
12. EUROPEREMOTELY

If you’re a job seeker looking to work remotely in European time zones (whether you’re from Europe or not), you’ll want to check out EuropeRemotely. This virtual job board is full of job listings from companies that are happy to work with at-home and remote employees who are interesting in doing work based on European time zones.

13. JOBSCRIBE

Jobscribe is a site that sends out daily emails to job seekers with remote job listings at tech startups. Web designers, web developers, mobile app designers, and digital marketers can specify their focus and receive listings for corresponding remote and work-from-home positions.

14. WFH.IO

Wfh.io focuses exclusively on remote digital and tech jobs. They include remote jobs in product management, software engineering, web engineering, customer support, marketing, and more.

15. OUTSOURCELY

Outsourcely pairs up remote workers with employers seeking both full and part-time employees. You can browse for jobs by category: design & multimedia, web development, writing & content, customer service, sales & marketing, and more.

Looking for Remote Companies That Offer Flexible Schedules, High Pay, and Creative Work? Try These Tech-Related Job Boards With Remote Options

16. POWERTOFLY

PowerToFly is a dream come true for female job seekers interested in working remotely. PowerToFly focuses on matching women in tech with remote and work-from-home jobs. If you join the site’s talent database, you’ll then go through a vetting process and get matched for a paid trial (a 2-4 week test period) with a potential employer. The site was started by two tech-savvy moms who were dedicate to making other women’s digital nomad dreams a reality, and PowerToFly continues that mission today.

17. LANDING.JOBS

While Landing Jobs doesn’t have a huge section of their tech job opportunities dedicated to working remotely, they do carefully curate their listings. As a bonus perk—unlike many job boards—their site allows you to filter your search for jobs that are either fully remote, partially remote, or even remote within physical commuting distance.

18. AUTHENTIC JOBS

Authentic Jobs bills itself as the “the job board for web professionals.” While its position listings aren’t remote specific, working remotely is common in tech, which means you’ll find plenty of remote listings here. Just click the “wireless logo” the site uses for its jobs search and then filter by remote jobs. This is a beautifully designed and easy to use virtual job board, reflective of its focus on providing job opportunities for web designers and web developers.

19. DRIBBBLE

Dribbble is most often known as a pillar site for freelance web designers to share their portfolios and find their next gig—but it has a lesser known jobs listing feature, too. There’s a location tab on top of the screen where you can click “remote / anywhere” and then be off to the races finding your next work-from-home gig.
20. ANGELLIST

Have you always dreamed of working for a tech startup, but don’t live in a tech hub? That’s the beauty of working remotely—it doesn’t matter! If you head over to AngelList—a top source for startup job listings—you can enter a for a job search and click “Remote OK” when you’re prompted for your search type. Then—tech hub or not—you can find a startup that’s right for you.

21. STACK OVERFLOW

Stack Overflow is a go-to source for web development Q&A, but it also has a jobs board with listings for tech positions (especially web developers). Enter “remote” in the location field when you go to search, and you’ll bring up a list of more than 2,000 work-from-home and digital nomad jobs that fit the bill.

22. GITHUB JOBS

GitHub is another hotbed of web development activity—web developers use GitHub as a repository from projects they’re working on where they can share code, questions, and discovers with other programmers. But, like Stack Overflow, it also has a job’s board, including an entire category devoted to remote jobs. Because it’s GitHub, the jobs are web development-focused, with remote listings from all over the world. GitHub even posts their own job openings on this board.

Wondering if tech is right for you?

Based on YOUR strengths, should you be a designer? A front end developer? Or even a digital marketer? Take our 3-minute quiz to figure out if a tech career is right for you.

Find Remote Work Online That Fits You With Freelance and Contract Jobs

23. TOPTAL BUSINESS

Toptal Business focuses on connecting business consultants with freelance corporate engagements. As a consultant, you can choose to only focus on remote work, and you can be choosy about working on projects (and with clients) you are passionate about. Whether you bring e-mail marketing expertise to the table, or you’re a whiz at building financial models, the Toptal Business site and model is both digital nomad and freelance friendly.

24. FIVERR

With jobs starting at just $5 a pop, Fiverr is an handy site for finding your first freelance gigs and building up a portfolio fast. The Fiverr site focuses on “gigs” or “micro-jobs,” like editing an image in Photoshop, designing a Facebook ad, or brainstorming SEO-rank-worthy article titles. You can also add any specific skills or credentials you have to your listings, allowing you to make a lot more than $5 on each job.

25. UPWORK

Upwork features freelance remote job listings in a suite of categories: things like virtual assistants, mobile app developers, and copywriters. Companies like Zendesk, Dropbox, and Airbnb use the site to hire remote freelancers, so if you’re ready to start doing freelance work for some major clients without having to set foot in an office, create your Upwork profile ASAP.

26. FREELANCER.COM

Freelancer.com claims to be “The World’s Largest Outsourcing Marketplace,” and it’s chock full of remote freelancing gigs. With over 13 million users, it features freelance jobs for PHP developers, content writers, and web designers alike. All you need to do is make a profile, and then you’re able to start bidding on jobs.

27. FREELANCERMAP.COM

FreelancerMap allows users to search thousands of active IT projects looking for remote, freelance team members. The site has a global reach, with projects currently listed on their front page from companies in the US, Australia, and the Czech Republic.
28. COWORKS

Coworks is a freelance work platform for creative job seekers (graphic designers, illustrators, web designers, etc). The site has connected over 2,000 clients with freelance work, catering to brands like Decathlon, Starcom, and BBH.

29. GUN.IO

Gun.io is a freelance platform designed for specifically for freelance web developers. You can sign up through GitHub (so make sure your GitHub profile is up to date and active), and they’ll help match you up with companies that need your services.

Regardless of Your Skills, Background, or Needs, There’s a Remote Job For You. Cast a Wide Net by Searching These General Interest Job Sites

If you’re looking for remote work online, try traditional job boards too. Some companies that typically only hire for specific locations post remote jobs as well.

30. THE MUSE

With a gorgeous user interface and extensive information about all the companies and jobs they feature, The Muse makes remote job searching feel easy. In addition to being able to search the best remote job opportunities listed on the site, you can avail yourself of The Muse’s top notch content highlighting remote work opportunities and tips to get started.

31. INDEED

Indeed pulls job data from across the internet and around the world, making it one of the most robust job search engines going. As of this writing, an Indeed search for remote jobs yields over 2,000 listings across positions as varied as cruise ship staff, clean energy interns, and SEO experts.

32. CAREER BUILDER

The Career Builder jobs site claims to be the largest online employment website in the United States. Simply type in “telecommute” or “remote” as a keyword, and you’ll find more than 9,000 part-time, contract, and full-time jobs from brands like Forever 21 Inc, Xerox, and Univision.

33. IDEALIST

Idealist isn’t an exclusively remote job board, but it still has hundreds of remote job listings worldwide (just click on “Remote” under locations). The catch here is that all of these jobs are with organizations and nonprofits that are committed to making a positive difference in the world. Work from wherever in the world you want, get paid, AND contribute to a worthy cause? That’s the definition of a remote win.

We put together a comprehensive resource hub for all things remote work. This mega guide on remote work has guidance on getting started working remotely, from finding a job to setting up your workspace.

This article is based on an earlier Skillcrush piece by Scott Morris.
Data Entry Jobs - Remote Work From Home & Online

Data Entry Jobs - Remote Work From Home & Online

Data entry is a type of clerical work that involves using various processes like typing and voice recording for entering data into computers. Data entry clerks work in industries such as healthcare, finance, retail and transportation. In this article, we identify the key features of this occupation and show you how to pursue employment in the field.

What is data entry?

Data entry is an industry in which employees add, verify and edit electronic data. Many companies need people to transcribe notes from meetings, add raw data into databases and add sales figures into electronic formats multiple times during the course of a business day.

A data entry job entails working as a handler of different types of electronic data and operating devices that professionals use to enter and edit data, such as a keyboard. There are a number of occupations in this industry, including typist, coder, transcriber or word processor.

Jobs in this industry have several different payment methods. If you start working in this industry, you could be paid by project, keystrokes per minute, keystrokes per word, keystrokes per hour or receive an hourly wage. Typically, the payment rate in data entry is based on your typing speed—fast typists are likely to earn more money in this industry.

How to gain data entry experience

When preparing for a career in data entry, it can be beneficial to pursue practical experience to help you in the role. In order to gain experience in the data entry field, consider taking these steps:

Pursue an education. You can look for educational opportunities through high school and college classes or through technical training sessions and workshops.

Complete an internship to decide if the career path suits you. You can also volunteer or intern in a data entry role to help make professional contacts in the field.

Obtain certifications. Earning a certification will improve your job prospects in the industry.

Types of data entry jobs

Here are the two main types of data entry positions and the features of each:

Remote

As a remote worker in the data entry industry, you can choose the location in which you carry out your job responsibilities.

You can typically choose your own hours.

Remote workers are unlikely to be paid an hourly wage and will be paid per project or per keystrokes during a specified period.

Employers prioritize reliability and the ability to complete tasks in remote workers, so your performance may be more important than your work history.

Working in data entry as a remote worker could give you the opportunity to earn some extra money while you work as a full-time employee in a different industry or pursue an academic degree.

In-house

If you work an in-house data entry job, you are likely to be paid an hourly wage.

Unlike remote workers, you can expect benefits such as merit bonuses and occasionally health benefits and paid time off.

Employment benefits that are linked to performance will be based on the speed, accuracy and reliability of your data entry.

How to succeed in the data entry field

You need several skills to be an effective worker in data entry. Keep in mind that you will need to spend a lot of time on your computer to develop these abilities. Follow these steps to excel in data entry:

Improve your language skills. You’ll need English language skills to work in the data industry. To prepare, learn to read, write and proofread your work at a high level.

Become a better typist. To teach yourself these skills, simply practice by typing anything into a writing program such as Word or Pages while you time your typing speed. Practice until you can type at least 35 words per minute. Consider using a free online test to identify your typing speed and find free online games that you can play to improve your typing.

Gain computer skills. To secure employment as a data entry specialist, you will need to know how to use computer programs to input and edit electronic data and save your work. Search for free online tutorials for popular computer programs, such as Microsoft Word and Microsoft Excel, on the websites of their manufacturer or on video hosting sites. It could also be helpful to learn how to use basic office machines that pair with computers, such as a scanner and a printer. There are many free online tutorials that can help you to learn how to use office equipment effectively. By following this method, you can become literate in some technical programs needed for data entry in a short period of time.
Bolster your interpersonal **skills.**As a worker in the data entry industry, you will need to communicate with employers and colleagues during your data entry projects. As customer service is a learnable skill, you can use free resources—such as articles and tutorials—that are available on the internet to learn about related skills. Imagine confrontational situations with an employer or coworkers and role-play what you would do in these situations to practice.

Advantages of working in data entry

Some of the advantages of working in data entry include:

Easy access to jobs. As many types of businesses need data entry workers, workers can often find employment readily.

Opportunities for independent contractors. Since a virtual workforce of independent contractors is significantly less expensive to manage than an in-house staff and more U.S. companies are outsourcing work, employment opportunities for freelancers in data entry continue to grow.

Low entry barriers. The cost and effort involved in gaining the skills needed for data entry are considerably lower than for many other jobs.

Warnings about working in data entry

While a part-time or full-time position in data entry could offer you many advantages, there are risks and deterrents in seeking employment in this industry. You can benefit from being forewarned about a few issues, such as:

Job scams

There are many work-at-home scams in data entry that can derail your effort to find work. These scams involve fraudulent offers of data entry jobs, promises of high salaries, identity theft or requests for money. You can use the following tips to minimize this risk:

Do your due diligence by researching a company that offers a data entry job. A legitimate company should have credible online information about its location, contact details, activities and workforce. Do not work for companies that lack this information.

Work only for companies that have been approved by consumer services such as the Better Businesses Bureau (BBB) or listed by the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC).

Do not give your personal information—such as your Social Security number or checking account number—to a prospective employer unless you have completed your research and found out that the company is legitimate. There is a risk of identity theft in some data entry scams.

Avoid companies that ask you to pay for administrative expenses, certifications, data on employers or training programs. A legitimate employer who offers a data entry job will not require any initial outlay from the job seeker.

Low wages

Earning a high salary can be difficult in data entry. Consider the following advice to address this issue:

Browse job listings to find the geographic locations and employers that offer the best salaries in data entry. Limit your job search to these areas and employers.


Use a part-time job in data entry to boost your income instead of relying on a data entry job as your only source of income.
How to Switch from Blogger to WordPress without Losing Google Rankings

How to Switch from Blogger to WordPress without Losing Google Rankings

Do you want to migrate your blog from Blogger to WordPress? While Blogger is a neat free tool to start blogging, many beginners soon realize its limitations, and they want to switch to WordPress to get access to more powerful features. In this article, we will show you how to properly switch from Blogger to WordPress without losing Google rankings.


Why Move From Blogger to WordPress?

Blogger is a popular blogging platform created by Google. It allows anyone to create a free blog using their Google account.

However, many beginners soon realize that there are a lot of limitations on what they can do with their free Blogger blog.

WordPress, on the other hand, gives you complete ownership of your website. It also allows you to add necessary features to grow and monetize your blog. We have created a detailed side-by-side comparison of WordPress vs Blogger.

It’s important to note that when we say WordPress, we are talking about self-hosted WordPress.org which should NOT be confused with WordPress.com which is a hosted solution that has it’s own limitations. For details, see our article on the difference between WordPress.com vs WordPress.org.

WordPress.org is the popular “WordPress” platform that you have likely heard about because it powers 31% of all websites on the internet.

That being said, let’s take a look at how to properly move from Blogger to WordPress while preserving your Google search rankings and website traffic.

Here are the exact steps that we will use to transfer from Blogger to WordPress:Sign up with WordPress hosting company.

  • Export your Blogger blog
  • Import Blogger to WordPress
  • Setup permalinks on your new WordPress blog.
  • Setup redirects for Blogger visitors to WordPress posts
  • Moving Other content from Blogger to WordPress
  • Things to do after migrating from Blogger to WordPress

Step 0. Before You Start

To get started with WordPress, you would need a domain name and web hosting.

For a quick primer, a domain name is your website’s address that people type to get to your blog, and web hosting is where your website files are stored. Both of these are a MUST HAVE to create any type of blog / website.

With that said, we recommend using Bluehost. They are one of the largest hosting companies in the world, and they are an officially recommended WordPress hosting partner.

Because Bloggerinstinct is the largest WordPress resource site, they have agreed to offer our readers a free domain name and a 60% discount on hosting. Basically, you can get started for just $2.75 per month.

→ Click Here to Claim This Exclusive Bluehost Offer ←

Once you have signed up for WordPress hosting and set up your domain name, the next step is to install WordPress on your hosting account.

If you signed up with Bluehost using our link above, then WordPress will be automatically installed for you.

If you used a different WordPress hosting, then you need to install WordPress by following our ultimate guide on how to install WordPress.

After you have installed WordPress, it is time to move your content from Blogger to WordPress.

Bonus Free Offer: Since a lot of you asked for this, we are now offering free Blogger to WordPress migration service as part of our free WordPress blog setup service. This means one of our expert team member will do the entire migration for you (100% free). Yes, you can literally switch from Blogger to WordPress without any risk.

Note: Our free blogger migration service is for smaller blogs that have less than 1000 blog posts. We can offer migration service for larger blogger sites, but that will be a paid service.

However if you are someone who likes learning and doing things yourself, then you can follow our step by step tutorial below.
Step 1. Export Your Blogger Blog

The first thing you need to do is export your Blogger blog’s content. You can do this by logging into your Blogger dashboard and going to Settings » Other page. Under the ‘Import & back up’ section, you need to click on the ‘Back up Content’ button.



This will bring up a popup where you need to click on the ‘Save to your computer’ button.



Your Blogger blog’s content will be downloaded to your computer in an XML file. Once the download is complete, it is time to import your Blogger content into your WordPress site.
Step 2. Import Blogger to WordPress

To start importing your Blogger site into WordPress, you need to login to your WordPress admin area and visit Tools » Import. On the Import page, go ahead and click on the ‘Install Now’ link below Blogger.



WordPress will now download and install the Blogger Importer plugin for you. Once it is finished installing, you would need to click on the ‘Run Importer’ link to continue.



On the Import Blogger screen, WordPress will ask you to upload the XML file. This is the file that you downloaded in Step 1.

Simply click on the choose file button and upload the XML file you downloaded earlier. Next, you need to click on the Upload file and import button to continue.



WordPress will now upload the import file. If your import file is too large, then you may see an error that your file size is too large. In this case, you would need to increase your maximum file upload limit. If your file is small, then you won’t see any errors.

Next, you will be asked to assign posts to an author. If you had multiple authors on your Blogger blog, then you can create a new user account for each author. You can also assign these posts to existing authors on your WordPress site.



After making your selection, click on the submit button to continue.

WordPress will now import all content from the Blogger export file to your WordPress site. You can view the content by visiting Posts » All Posts page.


Step 3. Setting up Permalinks

Permalinks is the term used for URL structure of individual pages. WordPress comes with a feature that allows you to set up SEO friendly URL structure. Since you are importing content from Blogger, you need your URL structure to be as close to your Blogger URL structure as possible.

To set permalinks, you need to go to Settings » Permalinks screen in your WordPress dashboard and choose the custom structure option. After that, you need to add the following text in the box next to the custom structure field.

/%year%/%monthnum%/%postname%.html



This permalink structure makes your blog posts URLs similar to the URLs on your old Blogger blog.

However, sometimes your blog post URL also known as slug in WordPress will not match the slugs used by Blogger.

To fix this, you will need to create and run a little code snippet. Please see our guide on how to copy and paste code snippets in WordPress.

You will need to add this code to your WordPress theme’s functions.php file.
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add_action( 'init', 'wpb_update_slug' );
 
function wpb_update_slug() {
global $wpdb;
$result = $wpdb->get_results("SELECT post_id, meta_value FROM $wpdb->postmeta WHERE meta_key = 'blogger_permalink' ");
$wpdb->print_error();
foreach ($result as $row){
$slug = explode("/",$row->meta_value);
$slug = explode(".",$slug[3]);
$wpdb->query("UPDATE $wpdb->posts SET post_name ='$slug[0]' WHERE ID = '$row->post_id' ");
}
echo "DONE";
 
}


After saving the code, you just need to visit any page on your WordPress site to trigger this script.

Note: After the script has run, don’t forget to delete it from your functions.php file because it only needs to run once.

Bonus Free Offer: Don’t want to deal with code? We have got you covered. Since a lot of you asked for this, we are now offering free Blogger to WordPress migration service as part of our free WordPress blog setup service. This means one of our expert team member will do the entire migration for you (100% free). Yes, you can literally switch from Blogger to WordPress without any risk.
Step 4. Setup Redirects from Blogger to WordPress

The most important step in moving any website is to setup proper redirection, so you don’t lose any existing traffic or SEO rankings.

The crucial part of the redirection is to make sure that your users land on exactly the same page on the new site which they were trying to access on the old site. At the same time, we also need to ensure that search engines understand that your website is moved to this new location.

To do that, you need to install and activate the Blogger to WordPress Redirection plugin. For more details, see our step by step guide on how to install a WordPress plugin.

Upon activation, you need to visit Tools » Blogger to WordPress Redirection page and click on the ‘Start Configuration’ button.



The plugin will now detect the URL of your Blogger blog and show you the option to Get Redirection Code. Go ahead and click on the ‘Get Code’ button next to your Blogger URL.

It will now generate a code snippet that you need to properly redirect users from your Blogger blog to your new WordPress site.

Next, you need to login to your Blogger dashboard and go to the ‘Themes’ page. Under your blog preview image, you need to click on the ‘Edit HTML’ button.



Blogger will now display the custom HTML code for your theme. If you made any customizations to your Blogger theme, then you may want to copy the code and save it on your computer as backup.

Otherwise, you can just go ahead and delete everything. After that, copy the code displayed by the plugin on your WordPress site and paste it into your Blogger theme editor.



Don’t forget to click on the ‘Save theme’ button to store your changes.

Next, we need to set up redirects for mobile users.

You need to go back to the Themes page on your Blogger blog’s dashboard. This time you need to click on the gear button below the mobile preview of your blog.



This will bring up a popup where you need to select ‘No. Show desktop theme on mobile devices’ option and click on the save button.



That’s all, your Blogger blog will now redirect all your blog visitors to your new WordPress blog.

Step 5. Moving Other Content from Blogger to WordPress

In this step, we will move other remaining content from Blogger to WordPress. This may require some manual work depending on the settings / content of your blog.

1. Moving pages from Blogger to WordPress

WordPress’ Blogger importer tool only import posts from Blogger and ignores pages. To move your pages into WordPress, you will have to edit each page in your blogger blog, copy its contents, and then manually create a page in WordPress.

To learn more about pages, see our article on the difference between posts vs pages in WordPress.

Now you will come across another issue. The blogger pages have URLs that look like this:

http://example.blogspot.com/p/about-us.html

Your WordPress page URL will look like this:

http://example.com/about-us

To fix this you will need to use the Redirection plugin. For instructions, please see our beginner’s guide on creating redirects in WordPress.

2. Widgets

Just like Blogger, WordPress themes also utilize widgets to add content to your blog’s sidebar. To add widgets, you need to visit Appearance » Widgets page on your WordPress dashboard and simply drag / drop widgets into sidebars.

For detailed instructions, see our guide on how to add and use widgets in WordPress.

3. RSS Feeds ‘

Search engines and users who subscribed to your blog posts via RSS feeds will still be able to find your blog. However, they will not get any new content.

To fix this, you need to visit Settings » Other page under your Blogger account. Next, you need to click on the ‘Add’ link next to Post Feed Redirect URL and add your WordPress feed.

Your WordPress feed URL will look like this:

http://yoursite.com/feed


Step 6. Things to do After Migrating from Blogger to WordPress

Now that you have successfully moved your Blogger blog to WordPress, let’s take a look at what else you can do to improve your blog.

We have created a checklist of the most important things you need to do after installing WordPress.

WordPress is quite easy to use. However, you’ll occasionally discover new things that you may need help with. 

We hope this article helped you switch from Blogger to WordPress without affecting your Google search rankings. You may also want to see our ultimate step by step WordPress SEO guide for beginners.
Get Paid to Write: 101 Sites That Pay You $50-$3000 per Blog Post

Get Paid to Write: 101 Sites That Pay You $50-$3000 per Blog Post

Getting paid to write articles from home is a dream job for a lot of us. And who wouldn’t like to get paid to blog about anything?

Freelance writing is actually one the easiest ways to make money online. There is no investment required. You don’t have to pay any “start up” fee.

The pay is relatively fast. In fact, there are many blogs and online magazines that pay you for stories and articles instantly. And there is no shortage of freelance writing gigs.

The only problem is finding sites that pay decent money for your content. We’ve gathered a list of online magazines and blogs that will pay you from $50 up to $500 or more per article.

Sites That Pay You to Write About Vacation/Travel

1. Transitions Abroad – $150 per post

Transitions Abroad’s focus is on people who travel, regardless of the reason – work, education, retirement, volunteering, etc.

They pay around $150 for travel related article.

They especially like articles written based on your own personal experience.

2. Wanderlust – £220 per post

Britain-based Wanderlust targets the travel market as well.


Writers are known to have received £220 for their feature articles (with article length around 1000 words).

3. Great Escape Publishing – $50 to $200 per post

Great Escape Publishing focuses on “the craft and business of getting paid to travel.”

Their audience contains people who are mostly looking for opportunities where they can get paid to travel -photography, travel writing, tour guide, cruise crew, etc.

They also publish short interviews with professionals who work in industries that allow them to get paid while traveling.

You can expect anywhere from $50 to $200 per article.

4. Alaska Airlines Magazine – $150 to $700 per post

This is the proprietary in-flight magazine found inside Alaska Airlines.

You get paid between $150 and $700 for every contribution.

5. Travel + Leisure Magazine – $1 per word

They are looking for writers with fresh ideas and tips.

The pay seems to be around $1 per word.

6. Air Canada enRoute – Pay unknown

This is an in-flight magazine read by over 1 million travelers every single month who find the magazine in the seat pockets of Air Canada aircraft and in Maple Leaf™ Lounges and select Star Alliance™ lounges around the world.

I couldn’t find any information on exactly how much they pay.

7. Horizon Edition Magazine – $100 to $450 per post

HEM is a monthly in-flight magazine for Horizon Air. The magazine is read by over half a million travelers every month.

They pay $100 for short articles.

Feature articles (usually much longer) will earn you about $450.

8. Delta Sky Magazine – Pay unknown

Out of all the in-flight magazines, Delta Sky is one of the most well-known ones.

They are looking for “executed stories about travel, lifestyle, and business.”


Your article can be short (100 words,) or long a (2,000 to 4000 words) feature stories.

You can send your pitches to edit@deltaskymag.com, or to: Delta Sky Editors, 220 S. 6th St. Suite 500, Minneapolis, MN 55402.

9. MotorHome – $900 per post

As the name suggests, this is a magazine for RV enthusiasts.

And as you can imagine, they want articles related to the RV lifestyle.

Here are the kind of topics they are interested in:Travel destinations
  • Activities and events
  • The newest motorhomes on the market
  • (RV related) do-it-yourself projects
  • RV service and repair recommendations

They do have a lead time of about four to six months.

The pay ranges from $100 to $900.
Sites That Pay You to Write About General Interest

10. Vibrant Life – $100-$300 per post

Vibrant Life is a bimonthly magazine with a focus on healthy living – physically, mentally, and spiritually- with a “Christian perspective.”

One very interesting fact about this one is that they do accept already published articles under certain circumstances.

Their guidelines page states that they will look at articles already published elsewhere if:


…the writer has sold only one-time rights or has written permission to sell the article elsewhere without a reprint credit.


You can expect anywhere from 4100 to $300 per article.

11. The War Cry – $0.35 per word

This is a magazine by The Salvation Army that has been in publication for over 135 years!

They pay per word:$0.35 per word for original content
$0.15 for previously published content

12. Guideposts – $250 per post

They accept articles based on true stories about people who achieved certain goals, overcame obstacles or learned lessons through their faith.

They pay upwards of $250. You get paid after the submission is accepted.

13. Chicken Soup for the Soul – $200 per post

Here is what they want:

Tell an exciting, heartwarming or funny story about something that has happened to you or someone you know.

If your content is accepted, it’ll be a part of the famous Chicken Soup for the Soul book series.

And yes, you may have to wait months and even a year or two until the next edition of the book is published to see your work.

You can also get paid for poems.

If they publish your story or poem, you will be paid $200 approximately a month after the book is published.

As a bonus, you’ll also receive 10 free copies of the book.

14. Power for Living – $125 to $375 per post

Power For Living is dedicated to Christian adults.

For short articles that range from 750 words up, the payout is $125.

Those longer articles (1400-1600 words) will go for $375.

15. AARP – Pay unknown (maybe $1 per word)

The AARP magazine accepts articles on topics such as money, health, business, food, travel, relationships, and more.

They don’t say how much they pay on the site, but from what I gather, it’s around $1 per word.
Sites That Pay You to Write About Short Stories

16. Tor – Pay unknown

They accept three different kinds of submissions:
  • Original Short Fiction
  • Novella
  • Non-Fiction
For Novella submissions, they offer an advance against royalties. The size of it will depend on factors such as the length of the story and how commercial it can be.

For non-fiction work, they’ll send you an invoice with details.


As of Jan-7-2017, they stopped accepting original short fictions.

17.Clarkesworld – $500 to $1,380 per post

Clarkesworld is a multiple award-winning (with 3 Hugo Awards among them) science fiction magazine.

They have a 1000 to 16000 word limit for each article.

You are paid 10¢ per word for the first 5000 words, and 8¢ for each word over 5000.

18. Harper’s Magazine – Pay unknown

Harper is a made in America monthly publication that publishes content about everything under the sun.

There is no information on how much they pay on the site.

19. The New Yorker – Pay unknown

This is arguably the most commercially successful magazine with a large international fan base.

You can submit short stories to take advantage of the amazingly huge readership over here.

They don’t mention the pay, but they do say it can take up to 6 months to hear back. So if you’re looking for quick cash, this won’t be the best option.

But it’s a great platform for getting your work and name out.

20. Asimov’s Science Fiction – up to $1,600 per story

Asimov’s name is universally associated with science fiction and they are much acclaimed by the international community.

The pay is $0.08 for every word, up to $1,600 per story.
Sites That Pay You to Write About Politics, News & Entertainment

21. The Christian Science Monitor – $200 to $225 per post

The Christian Science Monitor writes about everything contemporary, and they tend to have a slight national focus.

Their basic rate starts at $250. But it can go higher depending on the subject and the actual work.

22. High Country News – $0.50 to $1.50 per word

High Country News focuses its circulation on the American West.

The rate is $.50 to $1.50 a word (which is impressive considering that they are a not for profit organization), with a cap on 2,400 words.

23. The Sun Magazine – up to $2000 per post

The Sun Magazine is an elegant magazine with a huge slant on literary stuff.

A typical non-fiction article can fetch between $300-$2000.

24. The Nation – $150 to $500 per post

The Nation is a left-leaning publication.

Here are the kind of content they look for:Comments and analyses of news developments (approximately 750 words.)
Articles that use reporting and analysis to create in-depth content about issues (typically 1500-2500 words.)

They also accept poems.

Other topics of interests include:
  • civil liberties
  • civil rights
  • labor
  • economics
  • environmental
  • privacy and policing
  • feminist issues and politics.
For in-depth articles they pay is between $350 and $500.

For political commentary, the rate is$150.

25. Salon – Pay unknown

Salon covers entertainment news mostly.
Sites That Pay You to Write Jokes

26. Cracked – $50 to $200 per post

Cracked a massive and quickly growing humor site that is always looking for new content.

They pay $50 for four really short funny stories.

For feature-length articles, the rate increase to about $100.

27. Reader’s Digest – $100 per post

One of my favorite magazines. Reader’s Digest is actually kind of famous for its reader stories.

So it’s not a supersize that they’re always looking for new stories and content.


They pay $100 per article regardless of the length.
Sites That Pay You to Write About Education

28. Teaching Tolerance – $1 per word

This is a magazine geared towards teachers.

Their audience is a national audience of preK-12 educators interested.

The kind of content they look for include:
  • Diversity
  • Multiculturalism
  • Anti-bias and social justice
They pay up to $1 per word.

29. American Educator – up to $300 per post

American Educator is a quarterly magazine funded by the American Federation of Teachers.

It covers all aspects of teaching from the perspective of policy formulation, labors, trends, etc…

You are paid up to $300 per accepted article.
Sites That Pay You to Write About Religion

30. devozine – $25 to $100 per post

Devozine’s goal is to provide guidelines to young adults in order to strengthen their faith in Christianity.

You earn$25 for meditations related articles and $100 for feature-length articles.

31. The Quiet Hour – up to $115 per post

The quarterly issued Quiet Hour features anecdotal stories, and each one is to be closed with a prayer or quotation.

First-time contracts have a pay of up to $115.

32. Sports Spectrum – $315-$420 per post

Sports Spectrum tends to focus on how Christianity can inspire sporting success.

You can expect to fetch $315-$420 for an article length of 1,500-2,000 words.
Sites That Pay You to Write About Special Topics

33. Pentimento – $250 per post

Pentimento is focused on the disabled community, and making the public more aware of their needs.

They like well-balanced and engaging stories about the disabled community in general or real stories about specific disabled individuals and their lives.

They pay$250 per piece.

34. Drum! Magazine – $50 to $300 per post

As the name implies, it is all about drums.

If you have interesting stuff to say about drumming, you get paid $50-$300 for every feature article.

35. LightHouse – $100 per essay

This is a magazine/site focused on the blind and visually impaired community.

And they are looking for blind and visually impaired writers to submit content.

The underlying theme is not so much on the sufferings, but about conquering adversities in life.

They pay $100 for essays published on their blog. However, they do mention that for long or ambitious pieces, you can talk to the editors for a bigger payout.

36. Porthole Cruise Magazine – Pay unknown

This magazine sets out to collate and consolidates all things pertaining to cruises.

They do not mention the pay rate. Only that the payment is issued after publication.

37. DRAFT – $0.80 per word

As the name suggest, this is a beer related site, thus naturally they look for content related to the industry.

They pay $0.80 per word.

38. Rapid Media Magazine – Pay unknown

Rapid Media publishes four magazines, Canoeroots, Rapid, Adventure Kayak and Kayak Angler.

Each of these magazines has their own guidelines and pay rate.

39. Maine Boat, Homes & Harbors – $250-$500 per article

A magazine dedicated to covering boating in Main!

They like short articles of between 500 to 1500 words.

You can expect between $250 to $500 per article.

40. Country Magazine – $250 per post

As the name suggest, this is a magazine dedicated to the country lifestyle.

You can submit content about anything that relates to this lifestyle.

You’ll be paid a one-time fee of $100 per accepted submission.
Sites That Pay You to Write About Business & Money

41. eCommerce Insiders – $125 per post

They look for content focused on the online retail industry.

Here is how they pay:
  • $75 for articles between 400 to 600 words
  • $125 for articles that are 600 words long
  • $150 for articles longer than 600 words
  • 42. iWorkWell – $200 per article
iWorkWell is fully dedicated to human resource practices.

If you are in the HR business, you can make $200 per article here.
Sites That Pay You to Write Fiction

43. Fantasy and Science Fiction – up to $3000 per article

As the name suggests, this one is geared towards fantasy and science fiction.

The payout is 7-12 cents for every word, but the payment is a capped at 25,000 words, which means that you can potentially make up to $3,000 per article.
Sites That Pay You to Write About Parenting

44. A Fine Parent – $100 per post

They look for useful parenting tips.

The accepted article will be paid $75.

45. Scary Mommy – $100 per post

Update: They no longer pay. Although they still accept submissions.

Scary Mommy gives parenting a unique twist – practical tips presented in a humorous way.

If you can produce lighthearted yet useful parenting tips, you will be paid $100 for your article.

46. Babble – $150 per post

Disney is the parent company of Babble.

You can write about anything that’s relevant to parenting.

You are paid $150 for every 1200 words.

47. Youth Today – $150-$2000 per article

Youth Today is intended for the caregivers and policymakers of the youth.

The kind of stories they like include:
  • Best practices
  • Survey pieces
  • Issues
  • Management
  • Follow the Money
  • Professional Development
  • Debunking Myths
  • Funding
  • A Sense of Place
  • Sidebars
They don’t mention the pay, but I’ve heard anywhere from $150 to $2000 per article.
Sites That Pay You to Write About Lifestyle

48. Girls Life – $300 per post

This magazine gives useful updates and advice on boys-girls relationship, celebrity gossip, grooming, etc…

Payment can go up to $300 per article.

49. NY Times’ Modern Love Column – Pay unknown

This is the column piece found in the New York Times.

They encourage personal stories in relation to parenting, marriage, relationship and dating.

50. L.A. Affairs – $300 per article

This is another column in another famous.

They tell of the hot and not-so-hot aspects of the dating scene surrounding Southern California.

They pay $300 per accepted article.

51. Heroes and Heartbreakers – $1000 + 25% royalty

Popular publisher MacMillan runs this Heroes and Heartbreakers magazine.

They generally take in articles of 15k-30k words.

They pay $1,000 per story against a 25% royalty.

52. Italian America – $350 per post

True to its name, the magazine is always looking for Italian related stories and content.

They look for articles between 800 to 11000 words long.

You can expect $350 per piece.
Sites That Pay You to Write About Local Stuff

53. Boulevard – $225 per post

The Canadian-based magazine that tends to focus on the art scene in Vancouver Island.

They encourage short articles (around 850 words.)

The rate is 25 to 30 cents per word.

54. Big Grey Horse – $125-$200 per article

Big Grey Horse is a lifestyle blog from Texas.

They like blog posts written in first person POV ranging from 600 to 1,000 words.

You are paid $125 to $200 per post.

55. AMC Outdoors – $150 to $700 per article

AMC Outdoors’ main focus is on recreational activities around the Northern Appalachian.

For short submissions you get $150 to $400.

For feature-length pieces the pay is $500 to $700.



56. Vermont Life – $600 to $800 per post

Needless to say, this one is about all things Vermont!

According to their guidelines, the standard department rate is $600, feature rate $800.
57. 1859 Oregon’s Magazine – $150 to $250 per article

1859 Oregon’s Magazine celebrates the history and lifestyle of the region.

Payment varies from $0.30/word to $0.50/word.

They pay after publication.
58. Colorado Life Magazine – $75 to $975 per story

Colorado Life Magazine is dedicated to the entire Colorado state and the magazine uses clever and colorful storytelling to illustrate the many attractions in the state.

The rate ranges from $75 to $125 for short stories and $130-$975 if they are feature-length articles.
59. Alaska Magazine – $1500 per post

Alaska Magazine is well-known for its narrative style used to describe Alaska life in general.

Payment can go up to $1,500 subject to the article length and accompanying photo(s).
60. South Carolina Living – $200 – $450 per post

This is a lifestyle magazine published for the member-owners of South Carolina’s not-for-profit electric cooperatives.


Here are the kind of content they want:

Features: Pocketbook energy issues and travel/lifestyle/general-interest topics.Length: 1,500 to 3,000 words.
Rate: $450

Departments SC Stories: These are one-page mini-profiles.Length: 350 words
Rate: $200

SC Travels: Two-page stories on interesting places to visit in South Carolina.Length: 500-750 words
Rate: $300

Chef’s Choice: Profiles of interesting restaurants and the people behind them.Length: 500-700 words
Rate: $300
61. Douglas – $0.40 per word

Douglas is a business magazine that caters to the Southern Vancouver Island’s community.

They are often interested in feature-length articles (around 1,200 to 3,00 words.)

Pay is $0.40/word.
62. New Mexico Magazine – $250 per article

This is the brainchild of the New Mexico Tourism Department.

They like “story ideas about New Mexico experiences, with opinionated storytelling and a first-person point of view when appropriate.”

For short articles, the pay rate is ¢35 to ¢40 per word.

Longer ones (e.g. above 600 words) can fetch up to $250 per article.
Sites That Pay You to Write for Kids & Teens
63. Cicada Magazine – up to $2250 per article

Here the target market makes up largely of teenagers and young adults.

The rate is $0.25 per word, with a 9000 words cap, so the most you make is $2,250 for one single article.
64. Cricket Magazine – $0.25 per word

Cricket Magazine is a sports magazine for young readers.

The rate here is $0.25 for every word and they usually restrict to less than 2000 words.
Sites That Pay You to Write About Sports & Outdoor
65. Canoeroots – $0.20 per word

Canoeroots have just three publications every year, but they touch on all aspects of canoeing.

There is a limit of 2000 words on feature-length articles.

They pay $0.20 for every word.
66. Sporting Classics – $300-$700 per post

A magazine about fishing and hunting.

You will make $300-$700 for every accepted piece.
67. Blade Magazine – $150-$300 per article

As the name suggests, this one is all about knives.

Naturally, your content needs to be relevant.

You can earn between 4150 to $300 per article.
68. BirdWatching Daily – $400 per post

A magazine all about birds and bird watching.

For each accepted bird related article or photo-essay, you are paid $400.
69. Sport Fishing Magazine – $250 to $750 per post

Sport Fishing magazine offers a good rate for freelance writers.

It pays $250 for short articles and $750 for longer, feature-length articles.
70. Canoe & Kayak – $100 to $800 per article

They have been around since 1973, providing content for paddlers of every style and ability level.

They don’t mention the pay, but according to WritingCareer.com, they pay anywhere from $100 to $800 per article.
71. Hoof Beats Magazine – $100 to $500 per post

This is a magazine by The United States Trotting Association.

Obviously, this is a very niche subject so you have to know what you are talking about to get published.

Depending on the length, the pay varies from $100 to $500.
72. USDF Connection – $40 to $400 per post

This is published by the United States Dressage Federation.

They look for:features
health articles
personality profiles
how-to training articles
and first-person accounts of life in the dressage world

You can expect to be paid $40 to $400 based on the length and depth of your submission.
73. Wooden Boat – $250 to $300 per post

A bi-monthly magazine for wooden boat owners, builders, and designers.

They pay $250 to $300 for pieces containing around a 1000 word.
74. KungFuMagazine – Pay unknown

They look for Martial Arts related content – training, techniques, history, weapons, philosophy, well-known martial artists, etc.

They don’t mention the pay on their site.
75. Black Belt Magazine – $150 to $300 per post

According to the magazine, Black Belt Magazine is the oldest martial arts magazine in the U.S.

They pay $150 to $300 per article.
76. Boys’ Quest – $0.05 per word

This is an educational magazine for young boys that only publishes six issues each year.

They look for “lively writing” that explains things from a 10-year-old boy’s point of view.

They like short articles between 500 to 750 words long.

You are paid ¢5 per word.
77. The Chronicle of the Horse – $150 to $250 per news story

This is a magazine founded in 1973 geared towards dressage, hunters and jumpers, eventing, foxhunting, and steeplechase racing.

They accept the following submissions:

News storiesLength: 1500 words
Pay: $165-$220

Feature ArticlesLength: 1500-2500 words
Pay: $150-$400.
They also accept photographs which they pay $30 to $50 for each.
78. Kitplanes – $250 to $1,000 per post

This one calls itself “the leading independent voice of kit and amateur-built aircraft construction.”

They don’t have any restrictions on article length, but a typical article contains around 200 words.

They do pay generously, though – $250 to $1,000 per accepted piece.
79. Backpacker – up to $1 per word

As the name implies, this one focuses on hiking/backpacking related activities.

The payout can be as much as one dollar for every word subject to the complexity of the topic and your credential as a writer in this particular field.
80. Gray’s Sporting Journal – $100 to $1250 per feature article, $600 for yarns, and $100 per poem

Grays Sporting Journal revolves around the great outdoor, like hiking, fishing, hunting, etc.

The pay scale varies depending on the type of content. And according to the site, they pay based on quality, not length.

Here are the numbers according to the site:Feature articles: $600-$1250,
Yarns: $600
Poems: $100
Expeditions pieces: $850 to $1,000 plus $75 per picture published.

For the photographers among you, they also pay for pictures – anywhere from $50 to $300 per photo.

All payment is made upon publication.
81. Horse & Rider – $25 to $400 per post

As you’ve probably figured it out already, this is a magazine for fans of horse riding, and as such, they want content related to horses and riders.

Their payment scale ranges from $25 to $400, depending on article length, department, and research.
Sites That Pay You to Write About DIY & Home Improvement
82. Popular Woodworking – $250 per post

If you know a lot about woodworking or like to write about it, this one is for you.

They pay up to $250 for a 600-word-long article.
Sites That Pay You to Write About Art
83. Beat&Button – $400 per post

This is an online publication by Kalmbach Publishing Co.

It acts as a resource for everything jewelry-making. From projects and how-to guides, to inspirations, tips, and interviews with big designers.

You can earn up to $400 for feature-length article.
84. Howlround – $150 per post

Howlround is a site for theater lovers.

They make it very easy to pitch your content using their online form.

By filling out the form you give ’em a summary of what you want to write about, what section of the magazine it is for, and a little background about yourself.

You are paid up to $150 per published piece.
85. SpinOff – $50 per page

SpinOff is the magazine to go to when it comes to hand spinning yarns and fibers.

They pay per page and one page pays $50.

You can submit a maximum of 6 pages (or use 2,700 words as a guideline).
86. HOW – $250 to $800 per post

HOW is all about graphics design – from tutorials and guides, to inspirations, show cases and more.

They pay based on a set fee instead of per word.

Columns in HOW typically run around 1,200 words, while features are 1,500–2,000 words.

You can expect between $250 to $800, subject to stories covered and also credential of writers.
87. The Artist’s Magazine – $400 to $600 per post

With a circulation of 60,000, The Artist’s Magazine is one of the biggest publications focus on art exclusively.

They like practical lessons, engaging interviews, lively discussions of timely issues and news of exhibitions and events.

Expect anywhere between $400 to $600 per piece.
88. Pastel Journal – up to $600 per post

According to the site, Pastel Journal is “the only national magazine devoted to the pastel medium.”

It’s a bi-monthly publication with interviews, how-to demonstrations, and more.

According to their guidelines (found in this PDF,) they pay up to $600 for feature articles that can range anywhere from approximately 500 to 2,000 words.
89. Ceramics Monthly – $0.10 per word

This one is all about making things out of clay.

And if you can write about this craft, you can earn ¢10 per word.
90. The Earth Island Journal – $0.25 per word

The Earth Island Journal looks for “compelling and distinctive stories that anticipate environmental concerns before they become pressing problems, stories that scan the horizon for the next big issue.”

Here is how they pay:¢25 cents per word for print stories.
$750-$1000 for an in-depth feature story (about 4,000 words.)
$50-$100 for online reports.
91. Western Art & Architecture – $400 to $600 per article

This is a magazine for “art collectors and architecture aficionados across the United States.”

They have a few different columns and they pay varies based on which column you write for.

The columns include:Artist profiles
Home features
Illuminations
In the Studio
Perspective
Rendering
Wanderings
Western Landmark
Collector’s Eye

The pay ranges from $400 to $600 per piece.
92. Writers Digest – $300 for a 600-word article

Writer’s Digest calls itself “the No. 1 magazine for writers.”

It is published eight times a year and it’s main focus is to help writers write better and get published.

The pay structure

They pay ¢30 to ¢50 per word for manuscripts, for one-time print use and perpetual electronic use.

However, if they decide to reprint any of the content they purchased form you, you get %25 of the original purchase price per use.

So if your original piece was bought from you for $300 and they decide to reprint it, you get paid 25% of $300 which is $75.

And that’s per use. So if they use it 5 times, you earn a total of $375.
Sites That Pay You to Write About Science
93. Analog – $0.08 to $0.10 per word

This is an established market for science fiction stories.

Here is the pay structure:Short Fictions (up to 20,000 words): ¢8 to ¢10 per word
Serials (40,000-80,000 words): ¢6 per word
Fact Articles: ¢9 per word
Poetry: $1 per line
Sites That Pay You to Write About Farm & Gardening
94. The American Gardener – $150 to $600 per post

The American Gardener is the official publication of the American Horticultural Society.

It is a 64-page bimonthly magazine with nearly 20,000 members.

Topics include anything and everything about farming and gardening.

For shorter articles, they pay $150 to $200.

Feature-length articles will fetch $300-$600.
95. Hobby Farms – $300 per post

As the name suggests, Hobby Farms is a magazine for hobbyist farmers.

They don’t publish their rates so expect to do some negotiation, but they are known to pay up to $300 for feature-length articles.
Sites That Pay You to Write About Web & Technology
96. A List Apart – up to $200 per post

A List Apart is a site dedicated to “people who make websites.”

They publish three types of content:Features (between 1500 to 2500 words): Pays $200
Articles (between 600 to 1500 words): Pays $100
Mini-articles (between 500 to 600 words): Pays $50
97. iPhone Life Magazine – $50 to $100 per post

iPhone Life Magazine has a large audience of avid iOS users.

So if you can write about the iOS platform and anything related, this is a good choice.

Expect anywhere from $50 to $100 per piece.
98. The Layout – $50 to $100 per post

The Layout is all about the world’s best and most used CMS (Content Management System), WordPress (Yes, MoneyPantry runs on WordPress!)

They accept anything WordPress related.

They like articles between 700 to 1200 words long.

Expect between $50 to $150 per accepted piece.
99. PhotoshopTutorials.ws – $25 to $300 per tutorial

Similar to the Layout, PhotoshopTutorials.ws also features great instructional stuff, but its focus is on Photoshop.

Here is how they pay:Articles: $25-$50
Quick tips: $50
Full tutorials: $150-$300
100. DigitalOcean – $100 to $200 per tutorial

DigitlaOcean is an awesome cloud hosting service with tons of features.

They also serve as a kind of library for tutorials and step by step guides about Linux and FreeBSD cloud hosting.

A full tutorial will earn you $200 while shorter guides can earn you around $100.
101. Polygon – $0.25 per word

Polygon targets computer/video games.

They encourage short stories (approx 500 words.)

Expect ¢25 per word.
New additions
103. Unemploymentville – $50 to $100 per post

This is a site for “anyone who has felt the sting of being out of work.”

It’s a rather new site suggested by one of our readers.

Articles should be at least 350 words.

They pay $50 to $100 per article.
Final Words

There you have it, over 100 online magazines and publications that will pay you to write on a variety of subjects.

If you know of any other source, please share it by leaving a comment below.

Please be sure to bookmark and share this post on your social media accounts and check back often for updated versions with more sites.

And remember, this list by no means is a complete list. I’ll be adding to this list as I find other online magazines and websites that pay you to blog.